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GIRLS ROOM WALL DECORATIONS : WALL DECORATIONS


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Girls Room Wall Decorations





girls room wall decorations






    decorations
  • Ornamentation

  • A thing that serves as an ornament

  • The process or art of decorating or adorning something

  • (decorate) deck: be beautiful to look at; "Flowers adorned the tables everywhere"

  • (decorate) award a mark of honor, such as a medal, to; "He was decorated for his services in the military"

  • (decorate) make more attractive by adding ornament, colour, etc.; "Decorate the room for the party"; "beautify yourself for the special day"





    girls
  • A young or relatively young woman

  • (girl) a young woman; "a young lady of 18"

  • (girl) female child: a youthful female person; "the baby was a girl"; "the girls were just learning to ride a tricycle"

  • (girl) daughter: a female human offspring; "her daughter cared for her in her old age"

  • A person's daughter, esp. a young one

  • A female child





    room
  • A part or division of a building enclosed by walls, floor, and ceiling

  • board: live and take one's meals at or in; "she rooms in an old boarding house"

  • Space that can be occupied or where something can be done, esp. viewed in terms of whether there is enough

  • Opportunity or scope for something to happen or be done, esp. without causing trouble or damage

  • an area within a building enclosed by walls and floor and ceiling; "the rooms were very small but they had a nice view"

  • space for movement; "room to pass"; "make way for"; "hardly enough elbow room to turn around"





    wall
  • A continuous vertical brick or stone structure that encloses or divides an area of land

  • an architectural partition with a height and length greater than its thickness; used to divide or enclose an area or to support another structure; "the south wall had a small window"; "the walls were covered with pictures"

  • A side of a building or room, typically forming part of the building's structure

  • Any high vertical surface or facade, esp. one that is imposing in scale

  • surround with a wall in order to fortify

  • anything that suggests a wall in structure or function or effect; "a wall of water"; "a wall of smoke"; "a wall of prejudice"; "negotiations ran into a brick wall"











Room/Wall Decoration Art Set 1




Room/Wall Decoration Art Set 1





Pop art glitter board

Designs: Ladybird / Flower

Availability: Instock

Size: 20cm x 20cm

Price: $6/piece inclusive free normal mail
Promo: $15/3pieces inclusive free normal mail













Room/Wall Decoration Art Set 3




Room/Wall Decoration Art Set 3





Pop art glitter board

Designs: Giraffe / Elephant

Availability: Instock

Size: 20cm x 20cm

Price: $6/piece inclusive free normal mail
Promo: $15/3pieces inclusive free normal mail









girls room wall decorations







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INDIE ROOM DECORATING - ROOM DECORATING


Indie Room Decorating - Decorate Easter Eggs.



Indie Room Decorating





indie room decorating






    decorating
  • Make (something) look more attractive by adding ornament to it

  • Provide (a room or building) with a color scheme, paint, wallpaper, etc

  • Confer an award or medal on (a member of the armed forces)

  • (decorate) deck: be beautiful to look at; "Flowers adorned the tables everywhere"

  • (decorate) make more attractive by adding ornament, colour, etc.; "Decorate the room for the party"; "beautify yourself for the special day"

  • (decorate) award a mark of honor, such as a medal, to; "He was decorated for his services in the military"





    indie
  • an independent film company not associated with an established studio

  • (the indies) West Indies: the string of islands between North America and South America; a popular resort area

  • Indie music regarded as a genre

  • A pop group, record label, or film company of this type

  • a pop group not affiliated with a major record company





    room
  • Space that can be occupied or where something can be done, esp. viewed in terms of whether there is enough

  • A part or division of a building enclosed by walls, floor, and ceiling

  • an area within a building enclosed by walls and floor and ceiling; "the rooms were very small but they had a nice view"

  • space for movement; "room to pass"; "make way for"; "hardly enough elbow room to turn around"

  • board: live and take one's meals at or in; "she rooms in an old boarding house"

  • Opportunity or scope for something to happen or be done, esp. without causing trouble or damage











Doors and windows - Gujarat - India




Doors and windows - Gujarat - India





May village - Waga Dia and Machhukanah Rabari tribal people.

The region of Gujarat has played host to many a tribal culture and nourished them from the very earliest periods of history. One such tribe here, the Rabaris, still pursue a pastoral lifestyle—much in the same way as they did ages ago.
The Rabaris are a semi-nomadic tribe—pursuing a pre-agrarian, pastoral lifestyle—found mainly in the Kutch and Saurashtra regions of Gujarat. Though living today in permanent settlements, they are believed to have originally migrated from Baluchistan more than a millennium ago.
But over these thousand and more years, the Rabaris have undergone many changes and have been widely influenced by the local cultures with which they came in contact. Not only are they divided into distinct clans, they also prefer to trace their origin to Hindu Gods and even the Rajputs.
Without delving into the garbled clues provided by folk lore about their origin, a closer look at the Rabari today leads one into his quaint, colourful and rugged lifestyle.
By no means are the Rabaris an isolated people. The men are on the move—almost 10 out of the 12 months—in search of grazing pastures for their livestock; while the women and children remain in their villages. These villages are normally small, devoid of more than superficial amenities and, almost always, set in bleak, barren suroundings.
In a typical village, their rectangular houses, called vandhas, are built in rows. The white-washed mud walls and tiled roofs may have an appearance of starkness when viewed from outside. But within each house, the Rabari’s fondness for patterns is easily visible from the many geometric patterns that adorn its interiors. The tiny mirrors embedded into these mud-plaster patterns only enhance their beauty as they catch the faint glimmer of light streaming in from a small window or a low doorway. A home usually consists of two rooms, and an extended enclosure in the verandah which forms the kitchen.
The room at the back is normally used as a storehouse—a virtual treasure house of embroidered clothes and quilts kept in carved wooden pataras (chests); and the kothis and kothlas (granaries) made of mud and cowdung. The other room is mainly a living room decorated with embroidered torans or decorated doorways, while the doors are covered with brass foil etched in a myriad patterns. Often, the only piece of furniture that one might find is a carved, wooden cradle.
The community’s main stay is milk and milk produce from their livestock in order to purchase commodities that they trade in various forms at the local village or town markets.
Much of the handiwork seen in their decorated homes is that of their women. In fact, Rabari women are famous for their embroidery work, called bharat kaam, from which they make numerous traditional garments and furnishings. The kediyun, a gathered jacket with an embroidered smock, worn by young Rabari men and children, skirts and blouses for the women and girls—are al dexterously embroidered. Interestingly, the Rabari girl, completes over the years, her entire dowry which includes clothes as well as beautiful quilts or derkee.
Kokulashtami, after the rains, is marriage time. The men are back from their wanderings for this al important occasion. All marriages take place on this one day. Since child marriage is still very much in vogue within this tribe, outsiders are distrusted. Again, the Rabari marries only within the tribe and often into families which are closely located. Marrying outside the fold leads to social castigation and is very rare. While Rabari couples are probably the most exotically dressed, the marriage is a simple ritual performed by a Brahmin priest.
Rabaris, by and large, and ardent followers and worshippers of the Mother Goddess. Each clan has its own tribal goddess as the patron deity, though their homes often have pictures of other gods and goddesses as well. Strong tendencies of deifying and invoking the dead are still prevalent—a pointer to the community’s old world origin.
Another old world custom that has persisted is the custom of tattooing and there is a marked similarity In the motifs used in their embroideries and tattoos.
As an outsider it is difficult to communicate with these people since they speak a dialect which is a mixture of Marwari and Gujarati. But once they understand the visitor’s innocent curiosity, they exude the warmth and friendship that has always been a part of their make-up.












Tribal fantasy in Gujarat - India




Tribal fantasy in Gujarat - India





Rabari shepherd on the way to Chobari.

The region of Gujarat has played host to many a tribal culture and nourished them from the very earliest periods of history. One such tribe here, the Rabaris, still pursue a pastoral lifestyle—much in the same way as they did ages ago.
The Rabaris are a semi-nomadic tribe—pursuing a pre-agrarian, pastoral lifestyle—found mainly in the Kutch and Saurashtra regions of Gujarat. Though living today in permanent settlements, they are believed to have originally migrated from Baluchistan more than a millennium ago.
But over these thousand and more years, the Rabaris have undergone many changes and have been widely influenced by the local cultures with which they came in contact. Not only are they divided into distinct clans, they also prefer to trace their origin to Hindu Gods and even the Rajputs.
Without delving into the garbled clues provided by folk lore about their origin, a closer look at the Rabari today leads one into his quaint, colourful and rugged lifestyle.
By no means are the Rabaris an isolated people. The men are on the move—almost 10 out of the 12 months—in search of grazing pastures for their livestock; while the women and children remain in their villages. These villages are normally small, devoid of more than superficial amenities and, almost always, set in bleak, barren suroundings.
In a typical village, their rectangular houses, called vandhas, are built in rows. The white-washed mud walls and tiled roofs may have an appearance of starkness when viewed from outside. But within each house, the Rabari’s fondness for patterns is easily visible from the many geometric patterns that adorn its interiors. The tiny mirrors embedded into these mud-plaster patterns only enhance their beauty as they catch the faint glimmer of light streaming in from a small window or a low doorway. A home usually consists of two rooms, and an extended enclosure in the verandah which forms the kitchen.
The room at the back is normally used as a storehouse—a virtual treasure house of embroidered clothes and quilts kept in carved wooden pataras (chests); and the kothis and kothlas (granaries) made of mud and cowdung. The other room is mainly a living room decorated with embroidered torans or decorated doorways, while the doors are covered with brass foil etched in a myriad patterns. Often, the only piece of furniture that one might find is a carved, wooden cradle.
The community’s main stay is milk and milk produce from their livestock in order to purchase commodities that they trade in various forms at the local village or town markets.
Much of the handiwork seen in their decorated homes is that of their women. In fact, Rabari women are famous for their embroidery work, called bharat kaam, from which they make numerous traditional garments and furnishings. The kediyun, a gathered jacket with an embroidered smock, worn by young Rabari men and children, skirts and blouses for the women and girls—are al dexterously embroidered. Interestingly, the Rabari girl, completes over the years, her entire dowry which includes clothes as well as beautiful quilts or derkee.
Kokulashtami, after the rains, is marriage time. The men are back from their wanderings for this al important occasion. All marriages take place on this one day. Since child marriage is still very much in vogue within this tribe, outsiders are distrusted. Again, the Rabari marries only within the tribe and often into families which are closely located. Marrying outside the fold leads to social castigation and is very rare. While Rabari couples are probably the most exotically dressed, the marriage is a simple ritual performed by a Brahmin priest.
Rabaris, by and large, and ardent followers and worshippers of the Mother Goddess. Each clan has its own tribal goddess as the patron deity, though their homes often have pictures of other gods and goddesses as well. Strong tendencies of deifying and invoking the dead are still prevalent—a pointer to the community’s old world origin.
Another old world custom that has persisted is the custom of tattooing and there is a marked similarity In the motifs used in their embroideries and tattoos.
As an outsider it is difficult to communicate with these people since they speak a dialect which is a mixture of Marwari and Gujarati. But once they understand the visitor’s innocent curiosity, they exude the warmth and friendship that has always been a part of their make-up.










indie room decorating







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